/ Mount Elliot

How to summit Mt Elliot

The Bowling Green National Park (Near Townsville) is a southern outlier of the Wet Tropics bioregion and has rainforest growing at its summit as well as along the various creeks.

Hiking to the summit of Mount Elliot, Bowling Green National Park is a two dayer trip. Alan Simit, a well known adventurer in his 80's who has summited Mt Elliot 39 times thoughtout his life, has told me that the easiest way to get there is via the Terraces; which I happen to agree with.

Top of Alligator Creek

The best route (via The Terraces)

We started at Mountain View Lake Eco Park (where the Palm Creek Folk Festival is held) and rock hopped up via the "Terraces" (St Margaret Ck), past "high camp" as far as we could, taking one right fork, until we hit a massive cliff and waterfall, from there we climbed up to the right and along the ridgeline and then up onto the flat summit. We ended up camping up a few hundred meters away from the very peak because it was getting too dark to go on and we didn't want to walk with our headlights this time.

In the morning we made our way to the summit. Not much of a view, as expected, but the creeks are spectacular. The top is still battle damaged from Cyclone Yasi which makes it slow going as the vines have over grown patches south of the summit.

After that, we headed down Alligator Creek going bush at the top of the alligator creek falls and back down into the creek and along the walking track, seeing wild horses and a kite along the way.

Alternative routes

Alligator Creek

Start at the recreational area at Alligator Creek to the base of the Alligator Falls, followed by a steep climb up the falls. It's an easier way to overcome the initial steep climb to 500m that surrounds the whole mountain than coming from Cockatoo Ck. However, Cockatoo Ck is more interesting than the climbing the grasslands around Alligator Creek Falls.

Cockatoo Creek

The crazy way to summit Mt Elliot is via cockatoo creek. Follow the creek up past cockatoo rock (a monolithic looking, huge rock above the exit of cockatoo gorge) and then up the ridge towards the summit.
There are HUGE boulder fields near Cockatoo Ck that make this journey interesting.
TIP: Over-nighted on a bare rocky place with views to the Burdekin at about 1000m.

The Northerlies are a warm and moist winds which, I suspect, is why the Northern side of Mt Elliot has denser vegetation. Cockatoo creek and its tributaries have must have mush more rainfall that Alligator Creek as the sides of Cockatoo Creek have more rainforest and than the dryer sides of Alligator Creek.

Major Creek

Major Creek and Cockatoo creek form a straight line and cut the massive mountain into two. The valleys are filled with Lantana and gorges, Lawyer Cane. Be extra prepared when hiking from this direct and allow several days.

Tips

  • Look up a bare spot on the maps and plant to overnight there - view onto Townsville or view more towards the south.
  • You can't rely on mobile reception when hiking up there
  • There is a photo of a man holding a baby nailed into a palm tree at the northern end of the plateau (also keep an eye out for an egg-shaped rock)
  • There are two plane wreckages that I know of in Bowling Green National Park, One in Major Creek valley and the other near Mt Storth/Saddle Mountain
  • Secateurs came in very handy on this hike, often the pace slowing down to a halt as I was cutting my way through lawyer cane and vines. It was a long but rewarding hike.
  • If you plan to do it over night (Recommended), you will need a remote bush camping permit - Mount Elliot remote bush camp
  • The best time to attempt this hike would be the dry season, observe the remnant streams.
  • The riverine leaf-tailed gecko (Phyllurus amnicola) are endemic to the boulder-lined creeks of Mt Elliot at altitudes above 400m above sea level. Mt Elliot and it's entire mountain range is also home to two other endemic herptiles; the skink Glaphyromorphus clandestinus and the southern-most occurring Australian microhylid frog Cophixalus mcdonaldi. These three herps lies within the boundaries of Bowling Green Bay National Park.

What to bring

  • Sleeping gear (Tent or hammock)
  • Water containers. Water to be collected from the creeks. Treat to sterilize (boil, UV, chemical, or filter).
  • First aid kit and Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)
  • Topographic map & compass / GPS unit
  • Food for the two days
  • Cooking utensils, stove. Open fires are prohibited.
  • Secateurs for cutting through the rainforest as it get really thick in places
  • Torch or head lamp
  • Warm clothing as it can get cold at night (Weather dependant)
  • Wet weather gear (Weather dependant)
  • Rubbish bags. All rubbish (including food scraps) must be carried out.
  • Insect repellent
  • A small trowel for burying faecal waste. Bury human waste and toilet paper at least 15cm deep and 100m from camp sites, tracks and watercourses to guard against pollution and the spread of disease.